Copyright Act’s Public Performance Exception Costs Composers More Than $150 Million

The part of the U.S. Copyright Act that exempts some small restaurants and bars from paying public performance fees to collecting societies could be costing rightsholders more than $150 million a year, according to a study by the consultancy PMP Conseil.

The study was presented today (Nov. 8) by Keith Donald, chairman of the Irish Collecting Society IMRO, at a meeting of the International Council of Creators of Music. The research was funded by GESAC, the organization of European composers groups, in an effort to push the U.S. to change its copyright laws.

Source: U.S. Copyright Act’s Public Performance Exception Costs Composers More Than $150 Million | Billboard

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UK must use its EU influence ‘while it can’, say creative industries 

Various, Copenhagen, DenmarkThe creative industries need to make the most of the UK’s voice and influence in discussions over the digital single market and copyright framework while it “still has a seat at the table”, and exploit the “major opportunities” of non-EU export markets, representatives of the industries have said.

Speaking at a joint meeting last week of the Publishing and Intellectual Property All Party Parliamentary Groups on the digital single market and Brexit, representatives of the publishing, audio visual and music industries gave their thoughts on the UK’s post-Brexit trading relationship.

Source: UK must use its EU influence ‘while it can’, say creative industries | The Bookseller

US music biz urges Government to back EU proposals to squeeze YouTube ‘value gap’

Groups ranging from SESAC to SoundExchange, the RIAA, BMI, ASCAP and Azoff MSG Entertainment have jointly written to U.S. Ambassador to the European Union, Anthony L. Gardner, and other offices, calling for them to back Article 13 of the recent EC Copyright Directive.

The letter explains: “We enthusiastically support passage of Article 13 of the recent proposed EC Copyright Directive, which will benefit American creators by directly addressing what has been called the ‘Value Gap’.”

Source: US music biz urges Government to back EU proposals to squeeze YouTube ‘value gap’ – Music Business Worldwide

U.S. Supreme Court Wants Government’s Take on Copyright Takedown Case 

The U.S. Supreme Court wants to hear more about the legal issues underpinning a dispute over a takedown notice sent to a mother who posted a 29-second video clip on YouTube of her toddler dancing to Prince’s 1984 hit, “Let’s Go Crazy.”

The high court hasn’t yet granted review of the nearly decade-old dispute between Stephanie Lenz and Universal Music, but on Monday in a strong sign that the justices are at least entertaining the possibility, they invited the U.S. Solicitor General to express the government’s viewpoint about this case.

Source: U.S. Supreme Court Wants Government’s Take on Copyright Takedown Case | Hollywood Reporter

The Musical Twitter Bot: Who Has the Copyright for AI-Facilitated Works

copyright symbol in gold (3d)Tweet nicely to the Twitter bot, “LnH: The Band”—a newcomer in artificial intelligence music generation—and the bot will automatically compose melodies for you. The AI-based band is “currently working on their first album,” according to LnH Music, but who will own the rights and royalties to the album?

Or what about Mubert, which is touted by its creators as the world’s first online music composer, and which “continuously produces music in real-time … based on the laws of musical theory, mathematics and creative experience?” In other words, if a computer program generates a creative work—be it a song, book or other creation—is there a copyright to be owned? If so, who owns and gets to collect on the copyright?

Source: The Musical Twitter Bot: Who Has the Copyright for AI-Facilitated Works? – Lexology

MPs to use Digital Economy Bill to force search engines to ‘tackle’ piracy

A hardcore of MPs are looking to beef-up the new Digital Economy Bill by forcing search engines to tackle piracy by de-listing sites linked to piracy, and removing other content alleged to infringe copyright from their results.

It follows a lobbying campaign by copyright holders, who want to use the forthcoming law to force search engines into a binding ‘code of practice’ that will impose new rules on them, with the threat of fines if they don’t comply.

Source: MPs to use Digital Economy Bill to force search engines to ‘tackle’ piracy | Computing

Maria Pallante’s Departure From the Copyright Office: What It Means and Why It Matters

It’s not clear why Hayden removed Pallante, but media business lobbyists reacted with dismay and some politicians expressed concern. After Pallante resigned, Congressman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) and John Conyers, Jr. (D-Mich.), respectively the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Judiciary Committee, which has responsibility for copyright issues, issued a statement that Pallante’s departure would be “a tremendous loss for the Copyright Office and for America’s creators, innovators and users of copyrighted works.”

They don’t mention Hayden, who informed members of Congress of her decision the day before the announcement, but their displeasure with her decision is implied.

Source: Maria Pallante’s Departure From the Copyright Office: What It Means and Why It Matters | Hollywood Reporter