10,000 Radio Stations File Suit Against Azoff’s Global Music Rights

A group representing 10,000 commercial radio stations has filed a lawsuit against Irving Azoff’s Global Music Rights, hoping to force the performance rights organization to submit to Department of Justice-controlled pricing, similar to other PROs ASCAP and BMI.

GMR was created in 2014 by Azoff and Madison Square Garden Entertainment as a way to generate more revenue for its songwriters. Unlike other PROs, GMR was not governed by a 75-year-old consent decree that controlled how much it charged radio stations, venues, restaurants and other commercial music users for the performance of music within its repertoire.

Source: 10,000 Radio Stations File Suit Against Azoff’s Global Music Rights – hypebot

Internet Giants Warn of Mass User Terminations If Recent Appellate Ruling Left Untouched 

The recent appellate decision in the long-running lawsuit brought by record labels and music publishers against MP3Tunes didn’t get a tremendous amount of attention, but Google, Facebook, eBay, Twitter and other digital giants are aghast at the result and warning of dire consequences without a do-over.

On Oct. 25, the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals gave copyright holders some big victories by narrowing the circumstances whereby internet service providers can claim safe harbor from copyright liability.

Source: Internet Giants Warn of Mass User Terminations If Recent Appellate Ruling Left Untouched | Hollywood Reporter

European Publishers ‘Shocked’ at EU E-book Lending Ruling

In a case that first originated in the Dutch library system, the Court of Justice of the European Union–the chief judicial authority of the EU–has ruled that lending of e-books and physical books should be treated the same. The action brought concerns about the ‘one copy, one user’ model, which blocks a library from lending out more than one copy of an e-book at a time.

The case hinged on the interpretation of a 10-year-old EU directive covering book lending, which states “that the exclusive right to authorize or prohibit such rentals and loans belongs to the author of the work.

Source: European Publishers ‘Shocked’ at EU E-book Lending Ruling

U.S. Supreme Court Wants Government’s Take on Copyright Takedown Case 

The U.S. Supreme Court wants to hear more about the legal issues underpinning a dispute over a takedown notice sent to a mother who posted a 29-second video clip on YouTube of her toddler dancing to Prince’s 1984 hit, “Let’s Go Crazy.”

The high court hasn’t yet granted review of the nearly decade-old dispute between Stephanie Lenz and Universal Music, but on Monday in a strong sign that the justices are at least entertaining the possibility, they invited the U.S. Solicitor General to express the government’s viewpoint about this case.

Source: U.S. Supreme Court Wants Government’s Take on Copyright Takedown Case | Hollywood Reporter

Content Industry Gets Favored Interpretation of “Repeat Infringers” in MP3Tunes Appeal 

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act shields a service provider from liability upon certain conditions including the adoption of such a policy. However, both sides debated whether certain MP3Tunes users truly qualified as “repeat infringers.” The trial judge held that only those who are “blatant infringers” are subject to banning, but Lohier agrees with the copyright holders that this doesn’t match with the text, structure or legislative history of the DMCA.

Tuesday’s opinion comes to the view that a definition of “repeat infringer as limited to willful infringement is too narrow,” and that a repeat infringer “does not need to know of the infringing nature of its online activities, or to upload rather than download content.”

Source: Content Industry Gets Favored Interpretation of “Repeat Infringers” in MP3Tunes Appeal | Hollywood Reporter

Judge Finds Sony-Spotify Agreement to Be Ambiguous in Big Royalties Lawsuit 

When listeners hear “Since U Been Gone” by Kelly Clarkson on Spotify, they might not care too greatly how the exploitation of this song is characterized in contracts. But a judge’s interpretation could upend the record industry as streaming platforms continue to grab greater market share.

On Wednesday, New York federal judge Ronnie Abrams delivered a new opinion in an important lawsuit. She finds that many of the licensing agreements that Sony Music have struck with streaming outlets like Spotify, Rhapsody and Last.FM are ambiguous as to how they describe streamed music. The result is that the case will continue — perhaps eventually to trial — and heretofore confidential contracts will be dissected at length.

Source: Judge Finds Sony-Spotify Agreement to Be Ambiguous in Big Royalties Lawsuit | Billboard

RIAA, IFPI, and BPI File Lawsuit Against Top YouTube to MP3 Site

In a joint effort, The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI), the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), and the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) have taken Youtube-mp3.org to court. The RIAA announced the action against the service on their own website today. The lawsuit was filed in a federal court in California.

Youtube-mp3.org describes itself as “the easiest online service for converting videos to mp3.” All you’ll need to do is paste a YouTube URL into the search box to “convert the audiotrack of your videofile to mp3…and you will be able to download it.”

Source: RIAA, IFPI, and BPI File Lawsuit Against Top YouTube to MP3 Site