YouTube’s Content ID Update Enabling Creators To Profit From Disputed Videos Is Now Live 

In April, YouTube announced a long-awaited change to its Content ID policy, whereby videos under copyright dispute would still be able to rack up ad revenues. Today, that feature is live for all creators, the company said in a blog post.

“If both you and the Content ID claimant want to monetize your video, we will continue to run ads against it and hold those funds separately while the dispute is resolved,” writes Content ID product manager David Rosenstein. Previously, disputed videos generated no income whatsoever — which was especially costly for creators who felt it put too much power in the hands of claimants and made them vulnerable to incorrect claims.

Source: YouTube’s Content ID Update Enabling Creators To Profit From Disputed Videos Is Now Live – Tubefilter

Advertisements

‘The music industry is leaving billions on the table because we frustrate fans’ 

If I go to the website of almost every band on the planet with the intention of buying a pre-order vinyl album, an MP3, a ticket or a T-shirt, I am sent to four different stores, forced to enter my credit card four times, create four different accounts with companies I do not want to be associated with and deal with four different customer support centres chasing the delivery of my orders.

Try it yourself: I challenge you to actually buy something from the artists you work with, without wanting to hit your computer. Even better, try doing it on your mobile phone! It doesn’t work. The music industry has broken every rule in e-commerce; we have effectively broken the internet!

Source: ‘The music industry is leaving billions on the table because we frustrate fans’ – Music Business Worldwide

An End To 4 Minute Music Videos: How The Music Industry Can Fix Its Their YouTube Woes

The artist-and-labels-versus-YouTube crisis is going to run and run, even if some form of settlement is actually reached…the divisions and ill feeling run too deep to be fixed solely by a commercial deal. What’s more, a deal with better rates won’t even fix the underlying commercial problems.

Music videos under perform on YouTube because they don’t fit YouTube in 2016 in the way they did YouTube in 2010. The 4 minute pop video was a product of the MTV broadcast era and still worked well enough when online video was all about short clips. But the world has moved on, as has short form video (in its new homes Snapchat, Musical.ly and Vine).

Source: An End To 4 Minute Music Videos: How Record Labels And Artists Can Fix Their YouTube Woes – hypebot

How Much Are Pay Per Stream Royalties Really Costing Musicians? 

Is it fair that a 50-second song costs the same as a 20-minute composition? Back in the days of album-driven sales, track length didn’t matter much. If an album contains 50 tracks of 1 minute each (punk, grindcore), it would sell for roughly same price as an album with 3 tracks lasting 20 minutes each (post-rock, ambient).

Streaming services have changed this. Payouts occur on a per-stream basis. All songs treated equally. This means that if the amount paid per-stream is something like $0.005, Godspeed You! Black Emperor would make just 2 cents every time someone listens to Lift Your Skinny Fists Like Antennas to Heaven (runtime: 1h27m).

Source: How Much Are Pay Per Stream Royalties Really Costing Musicians? – hypebot

When Content Moves Faster Than The Money: Paul Sweeting Talks RightsTech Summit 

On July 26, Digital Media Wire (DMW) and Concurrent Media Strategies will present a RightsTech Summit in NYC to address a digital blind spot you may not know about.

If you think attribution when the term “Rights” comes up in the context of digital media, then you’re not seeing an important aspect as far as how tech breakthroughs have impacted content distribution. For now, let’s chat with conference co-chair Paul Sweeting, Principal of Concurrent Media Strategies, LLC, to get a download on the subject.

Source: Screenmancer | When Content Moves Faster Than The Money: Paul Sweeting Talks DMW Rightstech Summit July 26 Event

Download sales have fallen 24% in the past year in the US market 

According to a new mid-year report from trusted market monitor BuzzAngle, US single track download sales fell by a whopping 24.2% in the first half of 2016 compared to the same period in 2015.

Total digital song sales hit 410.5m in the six months to end of June this year, compared to 541.2m in H1 2015 – a loss of more than 130m downloads.

Source: Download sales have fallen 24% in the past year in the US market – Music Business Worldwide

How Media is Changing (Us)

Piracy was considered the music industry’s big problem. Now, piracy is no longer the hot topic, because licensed services have managed to stop the financial leakage and the industry looks like it has stabilized. These services, and particularly streaming services, have done a great job at understanding the reality of the networked age, in which information travels freely, and have built something that acknowledges that and adds value that certain segments of music consumers are happy to pay for.

The general industry never acknowledged the reality underlying piracy, instead seeing it as an obstacle to be overcome, and after dealing with the worst of piracy it has set its sights on something new: the streaming services. Yes, streaming royalties are low, because the real price of accessing content in the age of networks is zero. These services have figured out clever ways to inflate this price and now they’re under pressure. In our networked age, access to content was never the problem, and many have been suckered into thinking that if this problem can be solved, all financial woes will be behind us. Dead wrong.

Source: How Media is Changing (Us) — MUSIC x TECH x FUTURE — Medium