Merlin hails 73% rise in streaming revenues for indie labels

PrintThe survey offers a positive picture of the indie market, with 65% of surveyed labels saying their businesses grew in the last year, and 79% saying they are optimistic about their future prospects.

Digital is key to this, as you’d expect: 62% of Merlin’s members say digital is now more than 50% of their revenues – for a third, it’s over 75% – with 39% of labels saying that more than half of their digital income came from outside their home market.

Source: Merlin hails 73% rise in streaming revenues for indie labels

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TuneCore Artists Earned $42 Million Last Quarter, Up 16% 

tunecore_logoTuneCore artists earned $42 million in the first quarter of 2016, up 16% from the same quarter last year. Revenue from music streaming services like Spotify, TIDAL, Deezer and Rhaposdy has grown significantly, according to the digital music distributor.

More new TuneCore stats:

  • TuneCore artists’ earnings have grown by 730% from YouTube Art Tracks
  • Gross revenue has increased by 126% from YouTube Sound Recordings.
  • The Publishing Administration arm of TuneCore has seen a 188% increase in sync revenue.
  • Placements in popular TV shows include Empire, Grey’s Anatomy, The Goldbergs and Shameless.

Source: TuneCore Artists Earned $42 Million Last Quarter, Up 16% – hypebot

Self-published authors have found a way to actually make money

screenshot-qz.com 2016-06-08 16-13-50As the power of the “Big Five” publishers (Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster) in the US ebook market wanes, self-publishing authors have overtaken them in terms of unit sales.

And though Author Earnings shows that in terms of gross dollars made off ebooks, Big Five publishers do better than self-published authors, the site also shows that as a group, self-published authors are taking home more of the pie than those who publish with the Big Five.

Source: Self-published authors have found a way to actually make money — Quartz

NeuLion acquires Saffron Digital 

saffron_neulion_7_June_2016NeuLion believes that the combined synergies derived from adding its experience in delivering live TV channels and live sports to the Saffron assets acquisition can transform the over-the-top (OTT) challenges faced by owners and rights holders of sports, entertainment, films and TV channels.

It adds that the combined entity can now reduce project complexities for all content rights holders of existing and new OTT services by decreasing the number of vendors involved in their projects and ‘significantly’ decrease time to market for new OTT and TV everywhere services in comparison to other technology options.

Source: NeuLion acquires Saffron Digital | OTT | News | Rapid TV News

WMG buys X5 Music as major labels double down on playlists

Yesterday’s news that Warner Music Group has bought X5 Music – with reports in Sweden suggesting the price may have been $25m – is the latest sign of major labels doubling down in their efforts to do more with playlists and streaming curation.

WMG, remember, already bought British startup Playlists.net in October 2014, and has adopted its Topsify brand as the imprint for the label group’s own playlists on Spotify.

Source: WMG buys X5 Music as major labels double down on playlists

TuneCore CEO: YouTube is not the enemy – it’s a goldmine

As the major labels’ tanks rumble towards YouTube’s lawn, TuneCore CEO Scott Ackerman claims that independently distributed artists are increasingly seeing the video channel as both a goldmine and the greatest marketing weapon in their arsenal.

“Our artists see both YouTube and the streaming channels as a way to get their music out,” he tells Music Ally. “For most of our artists, that is their number one thing – they want their music heard. It’s not about money. They want their music out worldwide so everyone can hear it.”

Source: TuneCore CEO: YouTube is not the enemy – it’s a goldmine

Embracing Virtual Reality Could Enable Streaming Services To Finally Move Forward 

A few days ago, streaming service Rhapsody announced it was launching a VR app, with the initial content consisting mostly of performances shot at SXSW. The quality of the performances is fairly solid, and while the requirement that all videos be downloaded before being played means that live-streaming shows in the app is still not possible, it’s certainly a pleasant diversion and value add to be able to watch some shows and see what new artists might be like live.

But while this venture feels like a fun experiment, it also leads to much bigger questions — namely, is embracing VR the future of music streaming services? And if services get into the VR game, what does that mean for artists who planned on building and monetizing their own VR content?

Source: Embracing Virtual Reality Could Enable Streaming Services To Finally Move Forward [Cortney Harding] – hypebot