YouTube’s Content ID Update Enabling Creators To Profit From Disputed Videos Is Now Live 

In April, YouTube announced a long-awaited change to its Content ID policy, whereby videos under copyright dispute would still be able to rack up ad revenues. Today, that feature is live for all creators, the company said in a blog post.

“If both you and the Content ID claimant want to monetize your video, we will continue to run ads against it and hold those funds separately while the dispute is resolved,” writes Content ID product manager David Rosenstein. Previously, disputed videos generated no income whatsoever — which was especially costly for creators who felt it put too much power in the hands of claimants and made them vulnerable to incorrect claims.

Source: YouTube’s Content ID Update Enabling Creators To Profit From Disputed Videos Is Now Live – Tubefilter

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Inside YouTube’s War With the Music Industry 

Like any site, YouTube can stream material without artists’ permission thanks to 1998’s Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). The law allows companies to post copyrighted content online if they agree to take it down upon request. But in the YouTube age, this means artists’ representatives need to monitor hundreds of millions of new videos every day.

YouTube says it has addressed the issue, spending $60 million to build a “Content ID” program, which uses digital “fingerprints” to identify pirated material.This system catches 99.5 percent of copyrighted material, says Robert Kyncl, YouTube’s chief business officer. “I challenge somebody to find a better system of copyright management anywhere,” says Kyncl. “It’s been nearly a decade of us investing in the system when no one else does anything.”

Source: Inside YouTube’s War With the Music Industry – Rolling Stone

YouTube: 50% of Music Biz’s Revenue on Site Comes From Content ID 

The music industry has been complaining that YouTube doesn’t do enough to combat piracy. But Google says record labels are making millions from YouTube’s Content ID copyright-flagging system, and that the process is used 50 times more frequently than DMCA takedown notices.

In a report released Wednesday, “How Google Fights Piracy,” the Internet giant says that when music companies find copyrighted material they own on YouTube with Content ID, they choose to monetize more than 95% of those claims by opting to leave the content up on the platform to generate advertising (rather than blocking it). Indeed, 50% of the music industry’s YouTube revenue comes from fan content claimed via Content ID, according to Google.

Source: YouTube: 50% of Music Biz’s Revenue on Site Comes From Content ID | Variety

Industry Out of Harmony With YouTube on Tracking of Copyrighted Music 

At the core of the dispute is the Content ID system that YouTube built nine years ago in an attempt to turn videos uploaded by users into a business opportunity for copyright owners, while boosting its own advertising revenues. YouTube says Content ID works nearly perfectly to help record labels protect their music and make money from it, and keeps getting smarter.

But many in the music industry say the system isn’t automatically identifying many of their recordings when users have altered or combined them—or occasionally for no apparent reason at all. Furthermore, labels charge that Content ID doesn’t scan the YouTube channels managed by major TV networks and smaller networks such as Fullscreen and AwesomenessTV, many of which feature amateurs covering popular songs.

Source: Industry Out of Harmony With YouTube on Tracking of Copyrighted Music – WSJ

YouTube To Change Content ID Policy To Let Creators Profit From Disputed Videos 

Over the past few months, YouTube’s Content ID platform has generated a lot of controversy. The digital rights management service, which lets rights holders identify, claim, and monetize unlicensed use of their intellectual property, has drawn criticism from creators who believe it puts too much power in the hands of claimants.

Now, YouTube is responding. The video site has announced a change that will allow uploaders whose videos receive Content ID claims to accrue ad revenue on those videos as they contest the claims against them.

Source: YouTube To Change Content ID Policy To Let Creators Profit From Disputed Videos – Tubefilter