Spotify Seeks to Fine-Tune Music Rights as It Gears Up for IPO 

As Spotify AB gears up for a potential initial public offering next year, the music-streaming service is missing one key component in its pitch to investors: rights to play the music in years to come, according to people familiar with the matter.

Spotify is now operating on short-term extensions of its old contracts with all three major record companies, having been on a month-to-month basis with at least one of the labels for nearly a year. It is negotiating new deals that would make its finances more attractive to investors.

Source: Spotify Seeks to Fine-Tune Music Rights as It Gears Up for IPO – WSJ

Advertisements

Spotify IPO Watch: Brexit’s Bubble Bursting Bang 

Hanging over a Spotify IPO is the $1 billion in convertible debt that the company recently borrowed from Goldman Sachs, Dragoneer Investment Group, and Texas Pacific Group (TPG is also a Pandora lender, coincidentally–if you believe in coincidences).  Let’s assume that loan is in dollars.

If you take into account the loan’s 5% interest rate and the value of the warrant coverage in the deal, Spotify is essentially paying credit card interest on $1 billion (that 5% rate escalates 1% every six months until it reaches 10%, or Spotify registers an IPO).

Source: Spotify IPO Watch: Brexit’s Bubble Bursting Bang – Artist Rights Watch